Vancouver Archipelago

Perched at the western edge of the Fraser Sea, the Vancouver Archipelago holds what remains of a great western city.

This is the fifth in a series of extreme sea level rise maps. The other four so far are Los AngelesSeattlePortland, and San Diego.

If you think the funny place names have no place with such serious subject matter, I’ve made a map just for you!  Here is a version with no place names.

Buy the map on Zazzle!

See the original–Burrito Justice’s map of San Francisco.

This will happen someday, but not in our lifetimes. Some who have dared to speculate on a timeline have given themselves plenty of space for error in their predictions–one estimate says anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 years. Whatever the time frame, anthropogenic climate change is a fact–humans are speeding up this process.

I am not portraying any sea level higher than what is possible. Because I want to create compelling images, each of the maps I’ve made vary somewhat in amount of sea level rise. The USGS has estimated that the total rise would be about 80 meters.

Sea of San Diego

This is the fourth in a series of extreme sea level rise maps. The other three so far are Los AngelesSeattle and Portland.

See Burrito Justice’s map of San Francisco.

This will happen someday, but not in our lifetimes. Some who have dared to speculate on a timeline have given themselves plenty of space for error in their predictions–one estimate says anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 years. Whatever the time frame, anthropogenic climate change is a fact–humans are speeding up this process.

Each of the maps I’ve made vary somewhat in amount of sea level rise. The USGS has estimated that the total rise would be about 265′. I’m calling anything over 240 or so feet, up to what the USGS calculates as the maximum, as “all the world’s ice sheets”. Within this range, I render an ocean rise that I think is the most visually interesting. I am not portraying any sea level rise higher than what is possible.

Preview details of map:

h/t Burrito Justice for the inspiration and encouragement.

Bay of LA

Bay of LA

This is the third in a series of extreme sea level rise maps. The other two so far are Seattle and Portland.

See Burrito Justice’s map of San Francisco.

This will happen someday, but not in our lifetimes. Some who have dared to speculate on a timeline have given themselves plenty of space for error in their predictions–one estimate says anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 years. Whatever the time frame, it is a fact that humans are speeding up this process.

You can purchase LA Bay posters on Zazzle!

Each of the maps I’ve made so far (see Seattle and Portland) vary somewhat in amount of sea level rise. The USGS has estimated that the total rise would be about 265′. I’m taking artistic license with anything over 225 or so feet, up to what the USGS calculates as the maximum, and just calling it “all the world’s ice sheets”. Within this range, I render an ocean rise that I think is the most visually interesting. I am not portraying any sea level rise higher than what is possible.

Update: See other sea levels of LA.

Preview details of map:

h/t Burrito Justice for the inspiration and encouragement.

 

 

Islands of Portland

Islands of Portland

Welcome to Greenhouse Earth–Portland edition. The Portland archipelago awaits your descendants.

Available now at Beard’s Framing online or their shops in the Portland area!

This is the second in a series of sea-level-rise maps. Seattle was the first. There are more cities in various stages of completion, and I’ll be posting them as they are finished. Right now, I’m working on all the major North American West Coast cities, except for San Francisco, which has already been done. The loose confederation of future city-states is slowly taking form.

What fascinates me the most about this project is the landforms, bays, seas and other geographies that emerge. In Seattle’s case, the landforms were compelling up close–the hills and valleys of Seattle’s glacial topography made amazing islands and passages. For Portland, it gets interesting as you zoom out–the inland seas, islands, and fjords are what make this map fascinating to me. The Cordilleran Ice Sheet had massive influences on the geologies of both cities, but only indirectly here. The sheet didn’t extend this far south, but the Missoula Floods swept through many times–the result of breaking ice dams from the glaciers upstream.

Let me stress the approximate nature of the sea rise level of these visualizations. For the Seattle map, I used 240 feet. For this map, I’m using 250. The USGS has estimated that the total sea rise possible from ice sheet melt is 80.32 meters. Because I’m trying to convey both terror and entertainment, I put the sea level wherever the bays and islands look the most interesting, up to the maximum of about 263 feet.

Sea level rise of this extreme has been estimated to take anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 years, which may seem like a long time in the context of a single human life span, but in terms of human civilizations, it’s really not. Anyway, this end point is not really important. The real damage will come long before then–a small fraction of this 250′ level will devastate coastal cities.

h/t Burrito Justice for the inspiration and encouragement.

Preview details of map:

 

Islands of Seattle

Welcome to the Anthropocene! Behold, the Seattle Archipelago–a future history of the city of Seattle.

Purchase at Museum Quality Framing and Frame Central–both online and in Seattle area shops.

240′ is about the most severe sea level rise being talked about, and that’s only if all the world’s ice sheets melted. This is the extreme scenario. I don’t even know if researchers are seriously discussing this as a possibility. If it is, it’s a long way off.

When I first showed this map to people, the general reaction was horror. For me, it’s been more like detached fascination. If there are any humans left, what kind of society will be here–hunter/gatherer or godlike technology–dirt-floored huts or gleaming cities–The Road or Blade Runner or Metropolis.

I think the islands will be inhabited by pirates–tribes of Queen Ann islanders and Capitol Hill islanders living in shaky détente, with occasional forays on each others’ territories. The tribes of the Archipelago of Bainbridge or the Kirkland Peninsula will make weekend raids into the Seattle Archipelago, despoiling these fair island villages. So really, nothing much will have changed.

See my post on the Whole U website.

h/t Burrito Justice and Brian Stokle for the inspiration and encouragement.

Preview details of map:

See the original versions of this map here.

Heat Maps

While at the UW, I created a set of heat maps showing the density of responses to our Campus Landscape Framework survey. The survey asked a number of questions about the preferences and perceptions of students, staff, faculty, and alumni. I took the responses and visualized them geographically…

Geographic History–Philadelphia

“Morphogenesis of a Philadelphia City Block”

PhiladelphiaCityBlockThe first time I mapped out a historical geography was as a young SFSU undergrad. I recently came across this project while looking for old photos in my boxes of personal archaeology. I was thrilled to find it; I thought I had lost it long ago. I was ridiculously proud of this at the time–even though it only took a few hours to put together. When I researched this project, I hadn’t yet learned GIS, so the maps are hand-drawn.

This project was the first of many historical geographies I’ve explored, the last of which was the University of Washington campus.

I’ve never even been to Philadelphia.

Here is my original graphic:

PhiladelphiaCityBlock_crop

 

 

 

 

Friends from the Mid-80s–Antioch, CA

Xeni Jardin at Boing Boing posted this video of some old friends of mine from way back. Laden with nostalgia, I found these in some old boxes of negatives. I just scanned and uploaded them to Flickr today. I haven’t seen most of these people in decades. I hope they’re all doing well.

 

Here’s the original video on YouTube.

Bay of LA–Other Sea Rise Levels

As a follow-up to the Bay of LA map, here’s a slideshow of progressive sea level rise in the LA Basin. Click through the gallery, or scroll down for an animated gif.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

LA_Animated

Bebb & Gould Regent’s Plan for the UW, 1915-1945

The Bebb & Gould plan for the University of Washington–updated nine times between 1915-1945. North is left.

1915-1945 UW Regents Plan

This plan is a great display of both what was built and what wasn’t. A few roundabouts remain from the AYPE. Campus Parkway never had the grand plaza envisioned here. The South Campus golf links were replaced by the UW Medical Center, but never made it to East Campus (except, I suppose, for the driving range).

They seemed to care about maintaining a connection from the main campus to the South Campus waterfront–this was forgotten by the next generation, but has been recently made a priority again.

I’m glad they never enclosed the Liberal Arts Quad as shown here. In the way it was eventually developed, the elevation change as you move to the northeast gives a good sense of enclosure, and allows for an axis from the northeast dormitories into the central campus.

Denny Yard would be a much more interesting space if they had actually enclosed it as shown here. The energy of the Yard is sapped by a poor sense of definition. The tighter, defined plaza shown here would be a place to gather and be seen.